Norway’s Coat of Arms Has A Lion, Although There Are No Lions In Norway.

An Epic 10 Day Northern Norway Itinerary in Winter

King Harald V of Norway’s dominion arms are the source of the Norwegian coat of arms, which as a result symbolises both the king and the nation (nation and the state). 

Advertisements

It features a standing golden lion carrying an axe with a silver blade and wearing a golden crown on a red backdrop (blazoned Gules, a lion rampant Or, crowned Or, holding an axe Or with a blade argent).

The Norwegian Coat Of Arms

In accordance with the Constitution, the King (including the King’s Council), Parliament, and Supreme Court are the three branches of government that utilise the coat of arms. 

Advertisements

Additionally, it is utilised by a number of national, regional, and local agencies that report to the aforementioned, such as the County Governors, district courts, and courts of appeal.

The right to use the coat of arms or its derivatives has also been granted to former and current lands (such as the Earldom of Iceland and the Orkney Islands), cities (such as Kristiansand), organisations (such as the Museum of Cultural History), businesses (such as Adresseavisen), and families (such as the Counts of Gyldenlve and Gudbrand Gregersen). 

Advertisements

The usage of the coat of arms is prohibited unless authorised by formal document.

The coat of arms dates back to the 13th century and originally had merely a golden lion on a crimson shield. Late in the century, a silver axe was added to represent Olaf II as Norway’s Eternal King. 

The Sverre dynasty’s coat of arms, which were originally quartered with the Bjälbo coat of  arms.

When the Sverre bloodline vanished in 1319, and the Sverre coat of arms appeared in later divisions of the Norwegian kings’ coats of arms in the early modern era.

Advertisements

The coat of arms has taken on several forms over the years in terms of design, shape, and other factors due to shifting trends in heraldry and the arts. 

The axe handle progressively got longer and resembled a halberd in the late Middle Ages. 

Advertisements

The handle was typically curved to meet the chosen escutcheon (or changeable union quartering) shape at the time as well as the design of the coins. Subordinate state authorities and semi-official settings, as on banknotes, have also utilised the coat of arms.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: